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THE WANDERER'S TALE

Near the beginning, The Wanderer searched for meaning; this journey reached across all the times and places. It was an unyielding determination to unravel the great mysteries that finally led to the halls of Iscantik. 

As The Wanderer walked the halls of Iscantik, there appeared a door made of the oldest stone. It looked lonely, yet hopeful. The door was opened and therein revealed only a small table with a blank paper and writer lying upon it. The Wanderer took up the writer and wrote the first question on the paper. After only a moment, or was it ages, an answer appeared. Filled with the first edge of excitement, The Wanderer wrote another question, and another. With each inquiry, an answer appeared. This continued throughout time. Finally, The Wanderer realized that with each answer, there arose numerous more questions. The importance was not the answering of the questions, but the asking of the questions. It was this realization that led to the First Tenet. The writer and paper were left on the small table, and The Wanderer proceeded down the hall.

                                                              THE FIRST TENET:  Mystery is Growth

The path through the halls twisted and turned until another door appeared. This door was shrouded in shadow and waited like the trickster. The Wanderer opened the door to a vast hall of books; each as formidable as the next. The first book was selected and read, carefully. The Wanderer basked in the knowledge imparted until he knew its contents well. A second book was selected and read, carefully. However, the knowledge imparted from this tome seemed to contradict all from the first. The Wanderer selected and read, carefully, book after book. Each book now as daunting as the last. Each book offering different explanations, different reasons, different ideals. This continued throughout time. Finally, The Wanderer realized that no matter what knowledge he gained, there was always more and differing text on the same subject. It was this realization that led to the Second Tenet. The books were shelved, and The Wanderer continued through the halls.

                                                          THE SECOND TENET:  Knowledge is a trap

The halls began to revolve and cross without rhyme until yet another door appeared. This door was brilliant with color, swirling color. This door was at once both anxious and eager. The Wanderer slid the door to the side and beheld a box made of everything. The top of the box held one small button and one small hole. Upon pressing the button, The Wanderer received from the hole a small stone with a number etched upon it. With each press of the button, another numbered stone was dispensed; numbers from before to after, sometimes repeating themselves, sometimes entirely new. The Wanderer studied the numbers over and over; no pattern emerged. The inconsistency of the numbers and what they offered was maddening. The button was pressed, the numbers were studied. This continued throughout time. Finally, The Wanderer realized that it was not the numbers that held the pattern, it was the button. For even though the numbers gave no enlightenment, they did not appear without the pressing. It was this realization that led to the Third Tenet. The button was left unpressed, the stones ceased to be dispensed, and The Wanderer continued through the halls.


                                                         THE THIRD TENET:  Randomness is an illusion 

The Wanderer felt the halls become weary from its travels, when there appeared one final doorway. No door hid the one bright light that shone down. The Wanderer entered the glow of the light and was asked a thunderous question. "Do you know THE TRUTH?". The Wanderer replied with a simple "yes." The light went dim and The Wanderer turned in shame. The light returned again with its thunderous question. "Do you know THE TRUTH?". Now The Wanderer replied with a resolved, "No." The light went dim and shame was partnered with confusion. Each time the light returned with its thunderous question, "Do you know THE TRUTH?", The Wanderer struggled to give a different answer: "Maybe; A little; Some; I do not know; Help". This continued throughout time. Finally, The Wanderer realized that the question had no answer. "THE TRUTH" does not exist, but rather is replaced by "A TRUTH" that one finds within. It was this realization that led to the Fourth Tenet. The light remained, but left unanswered, as The Wanderer walked from the halls of Iscantik. 

                                                         THE FOURTH TENET:  Truth is relative

The Wanderer's Tale: Welcome
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